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pseudocon:

Nouveau Ancestors

Well, these took approximately a million years.  But hey, they’re done now, and I learned a lot long the way.  Unfortunately, I also lost the original order I wanted to put them in after they were paired up..  Oh well, first and last are still the same.

(via jumpingjacktrash)

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Anonymous said: What would you say defines Gryffindors? I've seen it as sort of "Gryffindors take the monster down, Hufflepuffs tend to the survivors and injured", but I think that might just be based off Gryffindor being "the hero house" in the books.

vastderp:

ravenclaws research the monster and plan the optimal attack strategy, hufflepuffs build the trebuchets, gryffindors ignore all the howls of protest and climb into the basket with their swords drawn screaming “LEEEEROY JENKINS!”, and slytherins know it’s a suicide mission and cut the ropes anyway because once the monster is sufficiently unsettled by being pelted by flying idiots, it will be easier for the ambush fighters to stun the damn thing before it can breathe fire and roast all the treasure.

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cigarettesandouterspacecomic:

isthistakenalready:

Aoi Honoo is Too Real

yo, the struggle.

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pencilstab:

ME TOO

(Source: iraffiruse, via jumpingjacktrash)

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roachpatrol:

wizard-of-ahhs:

Bruh

this is never going to stop being funny

(via jumpingjacktrash)

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blackoutballad:

oh man
sollux is a pretty nifty fella but i really can’t do him justice i’ll leave it to the pros

blackoutballad:

oh man

sollux is a pretty nifty fella but i really can’t do him justice i’ll leave it to the pros

(via kiriko-cchi)

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"Unseen, in the background, Fate was quietly slipping the lead into the boxing-glove."

— Jeeves and the Old School Chum (via marketsnodsbury)

(via wobblyasparaguslegs)

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the-real-seebs:

subterran:

the-real-seebs:

cyborg-femme:

"John Lennon Syndrome"

A white guy who preaches peace/love/good gender politics but is an abusive asshole to the people he is close to and does not uphold those values in his personal life.

Uh.

This is a really shitty thing to say about the guy, given that he was completely open about the abuse problems, and worked hard to fix them, and offered unambiguous apologies with no weasel words. The guy had problems, but I’d like to imagine a world in which people who have problems and work on fixing them get any credit at all ever?

people have no obligation to be nice to an abuser just because he felt sorry about it. he was still an abusive piece of shit. from what i’ve heard he never actually stopped being abusive towards any of his later wives/girlfriends, plus he was a heterosexist antisemite. anyway, i don’t see why anyone deserves credit for stopping something most people never start in the first place.

Long story short:

What is the purpose of your behavior with regards to a person? Do you have an outcome in mind?

My goal is for people to stop being abusive. I would like it even better if they never started, but that doesn’t seem to be possible, and in particular, it’s very hard for people not to develop abusive habits when other people might abuse them. Getting abusers to stop is a huge thing.

Think about The Scarlet Letter. If you aren’t doing a bad thing, and people say you are, why not just do it anyway, since you’re already being punished? And that, it turns out, is a factor that shows up when people try to get better. Yes, it’s obviously better if they just decide to be good regardless of how people treat them, but if you want to maximize the number of people who stop being abusive, the tactic that gets you there is “respect and recognize people who apologize and try to improve”.

To put it another way: Calling anyone, anyone whatsoever, a “piece of shit” actually turns out to play into the culture of abuse more strongly than someone who aplogizes and tries to get over his problems. You’re endorsing abuse by agreeing that there exist worthless people. The only way to beat that problem is to get used to the idea that absolutely everyone has inherent worth and deserves basic human respect and compassion. If you make an exception, even one exception, you have agreed that the abusers are right on their most fundamental claim, and are merely disagreeing with them on who goes on the list.

Also, you say “i don’t see why anyone deserves credit for stopping something most people never start in the first place.”

Answer: Because it’s harder.

It’s super easy for me to not be abusive. No problem. I do not face challenges. I don’t have to wrestle with inner demons every minute of the day to avoid being abusive. I don’t have to expend all my cognitive effort to avoid getting drunk and punching people. If someone starts being abusive, the chances are that they started out with violent inclinations I didn’t have.

I mean, you mention heterosexism. You know those smug assholes who gloat about how they’re pure and moral because of all the gay sex they’re not having because it’s repulsive to them? Okay, granted that neither of us accepts their moral premise. But even if you stipulate to the moral premise, they’re still full of shit because they are bragging about something that takes them no effort, and asserting their moral superiority for just happening to be a person who doesn’t have that impulse in the first place. And that’s really annoying, and that’s what you’re doing here. “Most people” don’t have the desire to be abusive in the first place. So when we proudly accomplish the amazing task of not being abusive, that’s actually completely unimpressive.

So, yeah, totally don’t deny or erase the fact that he did this stuff, and it was bad stuff. But don’t deny or erase the fact that he apologized, and that he admitted it was wrong. No excuses, no “lol they’re exaggerating”, he just outright said it was pretty fucked up and not at all okay. And that is behavior which requires him to overcome something most people have a really hard time doing, which is admitting that they are not always good people. And it is behavior which serves as a clear thing to point to when other people act poorly, because it shows them that you’re allowed to apologize and admit you were wrong.

But that only works if people admit that the apology is a real thing and matters.

And it’s true, there’s no obligation to “be nice” to an abuser. But there’s an obligation to “be basically decent” to everyone, and that includes admitting the things they did which don’t fit your model of them.

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"It’s strange. Why is my heart fluttering?"

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allybot:

Eae, a villain from ELSEWHERE, an OFF fan game currently in production, along with piratecoves, the-wandering-oracle, and coolelsen.

allybot:

Eae, a villain from ELSEWHERE, an OFF fan game currently in production, along with piratecovesthe-wandering-oracle, and coolelsen.

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sircuddlebuns:

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okay so what if every time equius accidentally breaks something he feels really guilty and just pretends he doesn’t see it

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elaienart:

Update for 10/9/2014:

Inkblazers | Smackjeeves | Tumblr 

Chapter title page! Got to draw Rina’s old hairstyle.

elaienart:

Update for 10/9/2014:

Inkblazers | Smackjeeves | Tumblr

Chapter title page! Got to draw Rina’s old hairstyle.

Tags: maria comic
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Do yourself a favor. Learn to code. Here’s how.

boomeyer:

I’ve said this to my non-techie friends countless times. It’s no secret that being able to code makes you a better job applicant, and a better entrepreneur. Hell, one techie taught a homeless man to code and now that man is making his first mobile application.

Learning to code elevates your professional life, and makes you more knowledgeable about the massive changes taking place in the technology sector that are poised to have an immense influence on human life.

(note: yes I realize that 3/5 of those links were Google projects)

But most folks are intimidated by coding. And it does seem intimidating at first. But peel away the obscurity and the difficulty, and you start to learn that coding, at least at its basic level, is a very manageable, learnable skill.

There are a lot of resources out there to teach you. I’ve found a couple to be particularly successful. Here’s my list of resources for learning to code, sorted by difficulty:

Novice

Never written a line of code before? No worries. Just visit one of these fine resources and follow their high-level tutorials. You won’t get into the nitty-gritty, but don’t worry about it for now:

Dash - by General Assembly

CodeAcademy

w3 Tutorials (start at HTML on the left sidebar and work your way down)


Intermediate

Now that you’ve gone through a handful of basic tutorials, it’s time to learn the fundamentals of actual, real-life coding problems. I’ve found these resources to be solid:

Khan Academy

CodeAcademy - Ruby, Python, PHP

Difficult

If you’re here, you’re capable of building things. You know the primitives. You know the logic control statements. You’re ready to start making real stuff take shape. Here are some different types of resources to turn you from someone who knows how to code, into a full-fledged programmer.

Programming problems

Sometimes, the challenges in programming aren’t how to make a language do a task, but just how to do the task in general. Like how to find an item in a very large, sorted list, without checking each element. Here are some resources for those types of problems

Talentbuddy

TopCoder

Web Applications

If you learned Python, Django is an amazing platform for creating quick-and-easy web applications. I’d highly suggest the tutorial - it’s one of the best I’ve ever used, and you have a web app up and running in less than an hour.

Django Tutorial

I’ve never used Rails, but it’s a very popular and powerful framework for creating web applications using Ruby. I’d suggest going through their guide to start getting down-and-dirty with Rails development.

Rails Guide

If you know PHP, there’s an ocean of good stuff out there for you to learn how to make a full-fledged web application. Frameworks do a lot of work for you, and provide quick and easy guides to get up and running. I’d suggest the following:

Cake PHP Book

Symfony 2 - Get Started

Yii PHP - The Comprehensive Guide

Conclusion


If there’s one point I wanted to get across, it’s that it is easier than ever to learn to code. There are resources on every corner of the internet for potential programmers, and the benefits of learning even just the basics are monumental.

If you know of any additional, great resources that aren’t listed here, please feel free to tweet them to me @boomeyer.

Best of luck!

(via cloudhime)

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snitchanon said: Say, could you construct a sentence with the words "I am a bad and evil person" in it? It's for... research.

snitchanon:

the-real-seebs:

Well, gosh, I can’t find any way that could end badly. Of course, I have trouble thinking of things sometimes because

I am a bad and evil person

(there you go with margins even).

You’re not gonna regret this no not at all nope nope.

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homestuckanime:

Here’s some great concepts from Ameryln!

homestuckanime:

Here’s some great concepts from Ameryln!

(Source: homestuckanime)